Online etymonline dictionary

clinic (n.) clinic. (n.) 1620s, "bedridden person, one confined to his bed by sickness," from French clinique (17c.), from Latin clinicus "physician that visits patients in their beds," from Greek klinike (techne) " (practice) at the sickbed," from klinikos "of the bed," from kline "bed, couch, that on which one lies," from suffixed form of PIE ....

Oct 13, 2021 · earth (n.) earth. (n.) Old English eorþe "ground, soil, dirt, dry land; country, district," also used (along with middangeard) for "the (material) world, the abode of man" (as opposed to the heavens or the underworld), from Proto-Germanic *ertho (source also of Old Frisian erthe "earth," Old Saxon ertha, Old Norse jörð, Middle Dutch eerde ...word. (n.) Old English word "speech, talk, utterance, sentence, statement, news, report, word," from Proto-Germanic *wurda- (source also of Old Saxon, Old Frisian word, Dutch woord, Old High German, German wort, Old Norse orð, Gothic waurd ), from PIE *were- (3) "speak, say" (see verb ). The meaning "promise" was in Old English, as was the ...

Did you know?

Our science dictionary will help explain the meaning of some of the most common science terms. Check out the science dictionary at HowStuffWorks. Advertisement Do you know what a m...c. 1300, "despite, contempt," from Old French prejudice "a prejudice, prejudgment; damage" (13c.) and directly from Medieval Latin prejudicium "injustice," from Latin praeiudicium "prior judgment, judicial examination before trial; damage, harm," from prae- "before" (see pre-) + iudicium "judgment," from iudex (genitive iudicis) "a judge" (see ...mass (n.1) mass. (n.1) late 14c., "irregular shaped lump; body of unshaped, coherent matter," from Old French masse "lump, heap, pile; crowd, large amount; ingot, bar" (11c.), and directly from Latin massa "kneaded dough, lump, that which adheres together like dough," probably from Greek maza "barley cake, lump, mass, ball," which is related to ...the study of the origin and history of words, or a study of this type relating to one particular word: At college she developed an interest in etymology. A list of selected words and …

Concomitant means occurring during the same time period. It usually refers to secondary symptoms that occur with a main symptom. Concomitant means occurring during the same time pe...Den online etymologiske ordbog (etymonline) er internettets foretrukne kilde til hurtige og pålidelige beskrivelser af oprindelsen og historien for engelske ord, udtryk og idiomer. Den er professionel nok til at opfylde akademiske standarder, men tilgængelig nok til at kunne bruges af alle.chemist (n.) 1560s, chymist, "alchemist," from French chimiste, from Medieval Latin chimista, reduced from alchimista (see alchemy ). The modern spelling is from c. 1790. The meaning "chemical scientist, person versed in chemistry" is from 1620s; the looser meaning "dealer in medicinal drugs" is from 1745, mostly in British English.Jan 3, 2024 · genesis (n.) genesis. (n.) Old English Genesis, first book of the Pentateuch, which tells among other things of the creation of the world, from Latin genesis "generation, nativity," in Late Latin taken as the title of first book of the Old Testament, from Greek genesis "origin, creation, generation," from gignesthai "to be born," related to ..."connected account or narration, oral or written," c. 1200, originally "narrative of important events or celebrated persons of the past, true or presumed to be; history," from Anglo-French storie, estorie, Old French estoire "story, chronicle, history," and directly from Late Latin storia, shortened from Latin historia "history, account, tale, story" (see history).

Oct 16, 2022 · science (n.) science. (n.) mid-14c., "state or fact of knowing; what is known, knowledge (of something) acquired by study; information;" also "assurance of knowledge, certitude, certainty," from Old French science "knowledge, learning, application; corpus of human knowledge" (12c.), from Latin scientia "knowledge, a knowing; expertness," from ...If you've given someone an iOS or Android phone, or just received one yourself, you might come across a few terms in blogs and other tech sites that could use clarification. These ... ….

Reader Q&A - also see RECOMMENDED ARTICLES & FAQs. Online etymonline dictionary. Possible cause: Not clear online etymonline dictionary.

diction. (n.) 1540s, "a word," a sense now obsolete, from Late Latin dictionem (nominative dictio) "a saying, expression; a word; kind of delivery, style," noun of action from past-participle stem of Latin dicere "to say, state, proclaim, make known, allege, declare positively" (source of French dire "to say"), which is related to dicare "to ...Justice is important because keeping justice, the act of upholding good and punishing evil, is necessary for having a safe society dedicated to the benefit of all people, notes Dic...ludicrous (adj.) ludicrous. (adj.) 1610s, "pertaining to play or sport" (a sense now obsolete), from Latin ludicrus "sportive" (source of Old French ludicre ), from ludicrum "amusement, game, toy, source of amusement, joke," from ludere "to play." This verb, along with Latin ludus "a game, play," is from the PIE root *leid- or *loid- "to play ...

May 16, 2023 · chemist (n.) 1560s, chymist, "alchemist," from French chimiste, from Medieval Latin chimista, reduced from alchimista (see alchemy ). The modern spelling is from c. 1790. The meaning "chemical scientist, person versed in chemistry" is from 1620s; the looser meaning "dealer in medicinal drugs" is from 1745, mostly in British English.In the world of language learning, a dictionary is an essential tool that cannot be overlooked. When it comes to learning English, having a reliable dictionary by your side can gre...Nov 26, 2023 · synonym (n.) "word having the same sense as another," early 15c., synoneme, sinonyme, from Old French synonyme (12c.) and directly from Late Latin synonymum, from Greek synōnymon "word having the same sense as another," noun use of neuter of synōnymos "having the same name as, synonymous," from syn- "together, same" (see syn-) + onyma, Aeolic ...

denalidaisy onlyfans etymonline is a great resource for looking up specific words. If you are at a university, you might have OED access, which is the most in-depth and hardcore etymology resource (if …convention (n.) convention. (n.) early 15c., convencioun, "a formal agreement, covenant, treaty," also "a formal meeting or convention" (of rulers, etc.), also "a private or secret agreement," from Old French convencion "agreement" and directly from Latin conventionem (nominative conventio) "a meeting, assembly; an agreement," noun of action ... f.a.qhow to clear my browser cache Stable link here: https://onlinebooks.library.upenn.edu/webbin/book/lookupid?key=olbp37415. … www gma The online etymology dictionary (etymonline) is the internet's go-to source for quick and reliable accounts of the origin and history of English words, phrases, and idioms. It is professional enough to satisfy academic standards, but accessible enough to be used by anyone."large group of people," from Old French compagnie "society, friendship, intimacy; body… See origin and meaning of company. betterhelp therapyapps for santawheniqork late 14c., "narrative with a happy ending; any composition intended for amusement," from Old French comedie (14c.), "a poem" (not in the theatrical sense) and directly from Latin comoedia, from Greek kōmōidia "a comedy, amusing spectacle," probably [Beekes] from kōmōidos "actor or singer in the revels," from kōmos "revel, carousal, merry-making, festival" + aoidos "singer, poet," from ... leaked photos selena gomez Whether you need to double-check the meaning of a word you think you know or you’ve run into new vocabulary, an online dictionary can be a quick way of getting the linguistic infor...The big dictionaries strive to compile every word that can be found so there is a complete record of a language. The Oxford English Dictionary, published in the late 19th century, ... zoom udfirst world cup in footballgoogle trust. (n.) c. 1200, "reliance on the veracity, integrity, or other virtues of someone or something; religious faith," from Old Norse traust "help, confidence, protection, support," from Proto-Germanic abstract noun *traustam (source also of Old Frisian trast, Dutch troost "comfort, consolation," Old High German trost "trust, fidelity," German ...Beeching, Cyril L., Dictionary of Eponyms, 2nd edition (REF PE1596 .B43 1983) Barnhart, Robert K., Barnhart Dictionary of Etymology (REF PE1580 .B35 1988) Brewer, Ebenezer. Brewer's Dictionary of Phrase and Fable (REF PN43.B65 1981) Brown, Lesley, New Shorter Oxford English Dictionary on Historical Principles, 2 vols. (REF PE1625 .N539 1993 v.1 ...